Back to top

MBL Courses

Notes from Hubert Goodrich's lecture. Trinkaus continues cleavage notes from page 7. Begins a new section on 'Periblast'
Notes from Frank Lillie's lecture. Trinkaus concludes his notes from the preivous page on the development of feathers.
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus continues his notes from the previous page on parthenogeneis with some thoughts from F.R. Lillie, and then the beginning of an outline on the 'Processes after fertilization'
Notes from Charles Packard's lecture. Trinkaus concludes his notes from Packard's morning lecture on the history of embryology (begin page 81) with some final thoughts from C.O. Whitman about epigenesis, heredity, and development, ending with the quote, "Facts without theory is chaos."
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus continues notes from page 86 on the metamorphosis of echinoderms with general notes on rudimentary formation. Includes two diagrams (labeled 1 and 2).
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus begins notes on the 'Visible Polarity in the Echinoderm Egg' with two labeled diagrams and notes on the history of research on the topic.
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus continues his notes on the development of the egg with information on 'internal potencies', 'visibles structure', and 'Invisible structure', then begins a new section on 'External Factors" with a diagram of a two-cell embryo
Signed "J. Philip Trinkaus, M.B.L., 1939, Embryology, I"
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus draws 6 diagrams of fertilization and the first cell division.
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus continues his notes on the echinoderm egg with information about the position of first cleavage relative to the axis of the embryo, with four diagrams
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus begins notes on 'Normal Development' with information on Asteroidea, Echinoidea, Ophiuroidea, including 3 labeled diagrams
Notes from Oscar Schotte's lecture. Trinkaus continues his notes on the echinoderm egg notes about the position of the first cleavage relative to the axis of the embryo. He offers results of various researcher's studies and concludes that "Vital staining method shows therefore that there is no coincidence of the 1st cleavage with the axis of the embryo"

Pages