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Net Work. Image #2

Man working on large mesh net.

Created: 1951

Net Work. Image #1

Man working on hand net

Created: 1951

Apparatus. Image #4

One man with apparatus in hand.

Created: 1951

Apparatus. Image #1

One man looking at an item on a shelf. Other shelves filled with miscellaneous parts

Created: 1951

Still construction

Two men putting together or repairing a large still

Created: 1951

Barron's Warburg.

Woman taking notes in front of large circular Warburg apparatus.

Created: 1951

Oven.

Man removing samples from scientific oven.

Created: 1951

Chemical.

Man operating distillation apparatus.

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #6

Man operating dials on x-ray machine.

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #5

Man looking up at metal balls of x-ray machine.

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #4

Lab image reflected in metal balls. Small view

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #4

Lab image reflected in metal balls. Small view

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #3

Man bending over x-ray machine.

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #2

Man using clamps to move test tube

Created: 1951

X-ray room, Mr. Hyde. Image #1

Man operating x-ray machinery.

Created: 1951

Cover of the 1900 (Volume 1) edition of The Biological Bulletin

Cover of the first edition of The Biological Bulletin

Created: 1900

Cover of the June 2014 edition of The Biological Bulletin

Credits from The Biological Bulletin: Snail Natica tecta feeding on the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Photo © Ross Coleman, University of Sydney)

Sea urchin Brisaster antarcticus (Photo © Ashley Miskelly)

Branching coral Acropora sp. (Photo by Maria Byrne, University of Sydney)

Bottom row, left to right

Foram Baculogypsina sphaerulata (Photo by Neo Wu)

Periwinkle Afrolittorina unifasciata on the limpet Cellana tramoserica (Photo © Ross Coleman)

Bryozoan Iodictyum yaldwyni (Photo by Abigail M. Smith, University of Otago)

Created: 2014

Cover of the 1898 (Volume 1) edition of The Zoological Bulletin

Cover of the first edition of The Zoological Bulletin

Created: 1898

Cover of the June 2006 edition of The Biological Bulletin

Credits from The Biological Bulletin: Large image: Illustration in pastel and colored pencil of Tritonia diomedea in mid-escape from its predator, the seastar Pycnopodia helianthoides, by Tamara Clark, Marine Biological Laboratory, <<A HREF="http://www.tamaraclark.com/">http://www.tamaraclark.com/>
Small images: Left, top to bottom:
Lymnea stagnalis, provided by Takeshi Karasawa (Tokai University, Shizuoka, Japan);

Created: 2006

Cover of the August 2012 edition of The Biological Bulletin

Credits from The Biological Bulletin: Large background image

Sea slug, Elysia chlorotica (Photo by Karen Pelletreau, Univ. of Maine)

Top row, left to right

Black carpenter ant, Camponotus pennsylvanicus (Photo by Adam B. Lazarus)

Bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes (Photo by C. Frazee, Univ. of Wisconsin)

Coral colony, Acropora spathulata (Photo by Madeline van Oppen, Australia Institute of Marine Science)

Bottom row, left to right

Nematode, Brugia malayi (© Mark Blaxter)

Created: 2012

Note from David Kirchman to Ivan Valiela at the Ecosystems Center

Note reads: "Ivan- You & the MBL Marine Ecology course got me going in this field. Thanks. David Kirchman"

Created: 2013

Winogradsky column used at the Ecosystems Center

This is a Winogradsky column that Joseph Vallino uses in a SES course on Methods in Microbial Ecology. Almost every bacterial metabolic process that occurs on Earth also occurs in these columns that are simply constructed by placing freshwater or marine sediments augmented with a carbon source (such as saw dust) and fertilizer (N and P) in a column and topping it off with either fresh or sea water. Julie Huber is a co-instructor in the course.

Methanotrophic microcosms used at the Ecosystems Center

These are methanotrophic microcosms that are being used to develop and test new approaches to modeling microbial biogeochemistry using thermodynamic approaches (namely, the principle of maximum entropy production).

Ecosystems Center researchers' model of nutrient flows in an estuarine ecosystem

Caption reads: "Figure 4: A diagrammatic model of carbon and nitrogen flow in an estuarine ecosysem that emphasizes inputs of organic carbon and nitrogen and inorganic nutrients from upland watersheds and processing by the estuarine food web. Compartments of the mathematical model are shown in the box. The inorganic nutrients compartment comprises both ammonium and nitrate. The organic matter compartment comprises three distinct components: labile nitrogenous material, labile carbohydrate material and refractory nitrogenous materal."

Created: 1993

Ecosystems Center researchers' figure of element cycles in terrestrial ecosystems

Caption reads: "Figure 3. Major element fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems."

Created: 1986

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