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Massachusetts Certificate of Incorporation for the Marine Biological Laboratory

Purpose "to establish and maintain a laboratory or station for scientific study and investigation, and a school for instruction in biology and natural history"

Created: 1888-03-20

Certificate of Affiliation, Marine Biological Laboratory and University of Chicago

Certificate of affiliation between the Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago

Created: 6/10/13

Proposal to establish a marine biological laboratory

Includes solicitation of subscriptions

Created: 1887-04-06

MBL Agreement of Association

Purpose "to establish and maintain a laboratory or station for scientific study and investigation, and a school for instruction in biology and natural history"

Created: 1888-02-27

Prof. Parpart and Shark

Two men examining shark trussed up be its tail. Syringe is inserted into underside of shark.

Created: 1951

Kempton in the "pit."

One man standing at a bucket on a table with fish in hand. Woman looking on. Second man standing looking at buckets on ground.

Created: 1951

Botany field trip to Penikese Island. Image #18

Man walking through a field carrying a seabird.

Created: 1951

Methods for obtaining and handling marine eggs and embryos

Manual describing methods for handling embryological materials available at Woods Hole, Massachusetts

Created: 1957

High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Protein Course Photo in the fall of 1978

Black and white group photo of the High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Protein course in the fall of 1978 posing in front of the Loeb building. Seventeen people featured.

Created: 1978

Man Standing in a Classroom

Black and white photo of a man standing in a classroom.

Created: 1978

Man Pinning Papers to a Classroom Wall

Black and white photo of a man pinning papers to a wall in a classroom.

Created: 1978

Discovery Never Ends. 2011 MBL Annual Report. Marine Biological Laboratory.

Published in two parts. Printed document includes message from the Chairman and the President, research highlights, education highlights, MBL at-a-glance, finanicals, gifts and leadership. On-line only additional information includes details for research, education, MBLWHOI LIbrary, and people. Lists of employees, students and faculty are contained in the additional information section.

Created: 2011

2012 MBL Annual Report. Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Published in two parts. Printed document includes message from the Chairman and the President, research and education highlights, MBL at-a-glance, finanicals, gifts and leadership. On-line only additional information includes details for research, education, MBLWHOI LIbrary, and people. Lists of employees, students and faculty are contained in the additional information section.

Created: 2012

2013 MBL Annual Report. Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Published in two parts. Printed document includes message from the President & Director, highlights, MBL at-a-glance, finanicals, gifts and leadership. On-line only additional information includes details for research, education, MBLWHOI LIbrary, and people. Lists of employees, students and faculty are contained in the additional information section.

Created: 2013

Squid from weir. Image #11

Man in small boat pulling a small shart out of the net at weir. Other fish visible in box in bottom of boat.

Created: 1951

Squid from weir. Image #10A

Man in small boat holding hand net above collection containers in adjacent boat. Squid can be seen in hand net.

Created: 1951

Experimental Invertebrate Zoology Course Photograph 1976

Faculty and students in the 1976 Experimental Invertebrate Zoology course at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Created: 1976

History of Science Seminar Photograph, 1993

Faculty and students in the 1993 History of Science Seminar at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Created: 1993

History of Science Seminar Photograph, 1992

Faculty and students in the 1992 History of Science Seminar at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Created: 1992

History of Science Seminar Photograph, 1990

Faculty and students in the 1990 History of Science Seminar at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Created: 1990

History of Science Seminar Photograph, 1989

Faculty and students in the 1989 History of Science Seminar at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA

Created: 1989

Big Bug Poem

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Created: undated

Field and buildings

image/jpg black and white image reformatted digital

Created: undated

100 Years Exploring Life, 1888-1988: the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole

In 1988 the Marine Biological Laboratory celebrated its centennial. In this well-researched, sometimes humorous, always human "biography" of this eclectic institution, historian of science Jane Maienschein catches a glimpse of what it is that has made the MBL so special to all who have spent any time there.

Created: 1989

James David Ebert (1921-2001)

James David Ebert (1921-2001)

James David Ebert studied the developmental processes of chicks and of viruses in the US during the twentieth century. He also helped build and grow many research institutions, such as the Department of Embryology in the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore, Maryland and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. When few biologists studied the biochemistry of embryos, Ebert built programs and courses around the foci of biochemistry and genetics, especially with regards to embryology. He eventually directed the MBL's Embryology Course, and later, the MBL itself.

Ebert was born on 11 December 1921 in the town of Bentleyville, Pennsylvania. He attended public schools while growing up and then graduated from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1942. Not long after graduation he joined the United States Navy and eventually became a lieutenant. Ebert was stationed on a destroyer in the Pacific Ocean that was attacked by a kamikaze pilot. The destroyer sank and Ebert spent twenty-four hours in the ocean until being rescued. Afterwards, as a biologist, Ebert befriended and trained several Japanese developmental biologists.

In 1946 Ebert began working towards his PhD in developmental biology under the instruction of Benjamin Willier at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. In the same year he married Alma Goodwin, who was a Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency during the war. Ebert received his PhD in 1950 and immediately became a member of the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. After one year at MIT, Ebert moved to Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Ebert became an associate professor of zoology by 1955, and he had started a program of experimental embryology. He studied chick embryos and the processes by which the protein make-up of the embryos changed throughout development.

Six years after receiving his PhD, Ebert became the director of the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Embryology, in Baltimore, Maryland. Prior to Ebert's term as director, the department had had three other directors. The Institution's president, Caryl Haskins, had contemplated closing the department and starting something new. However, with some persuasion from Willier, Haskins spoke with Ebert and decided to give him the opportunity to run the department. Ebert and Haskins agreed that the department needed to focus on the study of genes and their regulation as well as the ways cells influence one another. Haskins said that Ebert's youth and enthusiastic personality made Haskins believe that Ebert would provide a fresh perspective to the department.

Ebert argued that it was his job to recognize and to recruit new talent and then support them in their work. He stressed the use of biochemistry and genetics, which in the 1960s blended together to form molecular biology. During this time, Ebert started to study the relationship between muscle cell differentiation and the propensity to infection in the Rous sarcoma virus.

While still director of the Carnegie embryology department, in 1970 Ebert also became the president and nonresident director of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) at Woods Hole. At the MBL he researched, with Keiko Ozato, the response of murine lymphocytes to mitogens.

In 1977 Ebert ended his term at the Carnegie Department of Embryology, but he remained the director of the MBL. From 1978 until 1987, Ebert lived in Washington, D.C., and he was the president of the whole Carnegie Institution of Washington. As the institution's president, he made the decision to help build a large optical telescope in Chile at Las Campanas Observatory, and he worked towards the creation of a common campus for both Carnegie departments in Washington.

Ebert remained involved with scientific institutions for the rest of his life. When leaving one institution, he found another one to join. He retired from the Carnegie Institution in 1987 and became the president of the Chesapeake Bay Institute at the Johns Hopkins University, where he was a professor of biology for six years. Ebert was elected to many societies including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. He was the vice president of the National Academy of Sciences from 1981 through 1993 and he also chaired its Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable from 1987 through 1993. His colleagues elected him as president of the Society for the Study of Development and Growth, the American Institute of Biological Sciences, and the American Society of Zoologists.

In retirement, Ebert and his wife Alma spent half of each year in Woods Hole and at the MBL. Ebert and Alma died on 22 May 2001 in an automobile accident while en route to Woods Hole.

Sources

  1. DeHaan, Robert L., and James D. Ebert. "Morphogenesis." Annual Review of Physiology 26 (1964): 15–46.
  2. Ebert, James D. "An analysis of the effects of anti-organ sera on the development, in vitro, of the early chick blastoderm." Journal of Experimental Zoology 115 (1950): 351–77.
  3. Ebert, James D. "An analysis of the synthesis and distribution of the contractile protein, myosin, in the development of the heart." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 39 (1953): 333–44.
  4. Ebert, James D. "The effects of chorioallantoic transplants of adult chicken tissues on homologous tissues of the host chick embryo." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 40 (1954): 337–47.
  5. Ebert, James D. "The formation of muscle and muscle-like elements in the chorioallantoic membrane following inoculation of a mixture of cardiac microsomes and Rous sarcoma virus." Journal of Experimental Zoology 142 (1959): 587–621.
  6. Ebert, James D., and Ian M. Sussex. Interacting Systems in Development. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970.
  7. Ebert, James D., and Fred H. Wilt. "Animal Viruses and Embryos." The Quarterly Review of Biology 35 (1960): 261–312.
  8. Obituaries. "Jim and Alma Ebert." Marine Biological Laboratory. http://www.mbl.edu/news/obit/obit_ebert.html (Accessed December 8, 2007).
  9. Ozato, Keiko, William H. Adler, and James D. Ebert. "Synergism of bacterial lipopolysaccharides and concanavalin A in the activation of thymic lymphocytes." Cellular Immunology 17 (1975): 532–41.
  10. Singer, Maxine. "James David Ebert." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 148 (2004): 124–27.

James David Ebert studied the developmental processes of chicks and of viruses in the US during the twentieth century. He also helped build and grow many research institutions, such as the Department of Embryology in the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore, Maryland and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. When few biologists studied the biochemistry of embryos, Ebert built programs and courses around the foci of biochemistry and genetics, especially with regards to embryology.

Created: 2008-09-12

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